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The 4 Best Motion Duck Decoys for the Money – Reviews 2020 Photo by Florida Fish and Wildlife / CC BY If you want to bag a duck or two on your next hunt, a motion duck decoy will only make the job significantly easier. Even if it’s hard to conceive, real ducks really do fall for decoys when they see them moving realistically in their water. When hunting for any kind of waterfowl, you want your decoys to be as real as possible in order to draw more game over.

The 4 Best Motion Duck Decoys for the Money – Reviews 2020 Photo by Florida Fish and Wildlife / CC BY If you want to bag a duck or two on your next hunt, a motion duck decoy will only make the job significantly easier. Even if it’s hard to conceive, real ducks really do fall for decoys when they see them moving realistically in their water. When hunting for any kind of waterfowl, you want your decoys to be as real as possible in order to draw more game over. If your decoy isn’t moving or isn’t creating any ripples in your water, then it’s going to be significantly more challenging to attract a duck. Here are the 4 best motion duck decoys for the money: MOJO Outdoors Mallard "Motion Duck Decoy" MOJO Outdoors Elite Series Mini Mallard - Duck Hunting Motion Decoy (New) Price: $72.94 Price as of 08/14/2020 02:34 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. The MOJO Mallard is a premium quality motion duck decoy that is arguably one of the most revolutionary duck decoys on the market. It was redesigned in 2004 to be even better than its original reincarnation, since it now has no thumb screws and plastic wings that turn more at the speed of an actual duck to make it more realistic. The plastic wings also mean that the battery lasts longer and they are quieter. The battery itself is held very securely in an internal battery bracket, and the decoy can be easily set up at the stake thanks to a tapered breast peg. For added realism, the MOJO Mallard features excellent texture and an iridescent head. Check out the video below for more details (the feeder duck decoys in it can be found here ): Motion in decoys Watch this video on YouTube

Best Progressive & Single Stage Reloading Press (2020 Reviews)

Best Progressive & Single Stage Reloading Press (2020 Reviews)

Making your own bullets can be great fun, and opens up a world of new opportunities for both experienced shooters and beginners alike. With the range of powders, casings, and coatings available today, with a bit of experience you can make rounds that are perfectly suited to the type of shooting you do. And who knows, once your friends see the deadly accuracy and huge stopping power of the rounds you make, they may even want to buy some. Today, we’re going to take a look at some of my favorite reloading presses. These machines automate the ammunition manufacturing process, meaning that you can produce reliable and safe rounds more easily and much faster. First, though, let’s take a look at why you should consider making your own ammunition, and what you need to start. @import url("//fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Open+Sans:400,700&subset=latin");@import url("//fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Lato:300,700,400&subset=latin");@media (min-width: 300px){[data-css="tve-u-45bd34974a1514"] { background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-05bd34974a141d"] { border: none; background-image: none !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; margin-top: 0px !important; padding: 0px !important; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-25bd34974a149a"] { background-image: none !important; background-color: rgb(242, 237, 237) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-95bd34974a1640"] { margin-top: -10px !important; background-image: none !important; padding-top: 0px !important; padding-bottom: 15px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { line-height: 1.1em !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { font-family: inherit !important; color: rgb(5, 5, 5) !important; font-size: 17px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { line-height: 1em !important; }[data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] strong { font-weight: 700; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { font-family: Lato; font-weight: 400; font-size: 25px !important; color: rgb(5, 5, 5) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-75bd34974a15c8"] { padding-top: 0px !important; background-image: none !important; padding-bottom: 5px !important; text-align: center; }[data-css="tve-u-115bd34974a16b9"] { padding: 0px 0px 20px !important; background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-35bd34974a14d8"] { max-width: 760px; min-height: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] { margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px !important; padding-bottom: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] > .tcb-flex-col { padding-left: 0px; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] { border: none; border-radius: 5px; overflow: hidden; padding: 20px !important; margin-bottom: 20px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-85bd34974a1604"] { width: 85px; float: none; margin: 0px auto !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-145bd34974a1775"] { color: rgb(255, 255, 255) !important; font-size: 16px !important; font-family: "Open Sans" !important; letter-spacing: 1px; font-weight: 400 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-135bd34974a173a"] { overflow: hidden; max-width: 330px; float: none; width: 100%; background-color: rgb(241, 89, 42) !important; border-radius: 5px !important; padding-top: 5px !important; padding-bottom: 5px !important; margin-left: auto !important; margin-right: auto !important; z-index: 3; position: relative; }[data-css="tve-u-145bd34974a1775"] strong { font-weight: 700 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] strong { font-weight: 700 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] .tve-page-section-in { display: block; }}@media (max-width: 767px){[data-css="tve-u-75bd34974a15c8"] { text-align: center; background-image: none !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { font-size: 22px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-05bd34974a141d"] { background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-25bd34974a149a"] { background-image: none !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { font-size: 28px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-95bd34974a1640"] { background-image: none !important; padding-top: 10px !important; padding-bottom: 10px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] { padding-top: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-45bd34974a1514"] { background-image: none !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] { padding-bottom: 20px !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; padding-left: 10px !important; padding-right: 10px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-115bd34974a16b9"] { padding: 10px 0px !important; background-image: none !important; }} .tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h1,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h2,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h3{margin:0;padding:0}.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element p,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h1,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h2,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h3{margin:0} Get Deals on Guns and Tactical Gear Join 70,000 Readers For Our Weekly Discounts ​ GET MY DISCOUNTS Product Type of Press Price Where To Buy Dillon Square Deal B For Beginners $$ Dillon RL 550B Mid-Range $$ Dillon Super 1050 High-Volume $$$ Mark VII Automated $$$$ Table of Contents 1 Why Make Your Own Ammunition? 2 Getting Started 3 Don’t Hurt Yourself 4 Types of Reloading Press 5 Choosing a Reloading Press 6 4 Best Reloading Presses Available Today 7 Main Advantages of a Progressive Press 8 Our Final Thoughts "Why Make Your" Own Ammunition? I’ve been making my own ammunition for quite a few years now, and still find it a hugely enjoyable process. I have a few friends for who the process has become a little repetitive and boring, but for me the process of carefully preparing each round is a joy. The task is actually quite relaxing, you get the feeling of being a real craftsman, a satisfying feeling of a job well done, and then the ultimate satisfaction of firing off a round that you have made yourself. Beyond this, there are a few other reasons to start making your own ammo. It can save you money in the long term , of course, because buying raw casings and powder is cheaper than buying pre-prepared bullets. The major advantage of making your own ammunition is actually in the level of customization you are able to achieve . If you are an experienced shooter, you probably already have a few favorite rounds, but are also aware of some of the limitations of each. By making your own ammo, you are able to design rounds that perfectly fit your needs , and this in turn will improve your shooting performance. Still not convinced? I know, for a lot of people, taking the decision to start making their own ammo can be a scary one. After all, you are messing around with live explosives. If you still have doubts, know that the only obstacle you face is one of education – people have been making their own rounds for centuries , without the benefits of the internet, so get online and educate yourself. Getting Started Once you’ve taken the decision to start making your own ammunition, you have a few more decisions to make. First, you need to decide which calibre bullets you are going to produce , and then pick out the various components that make up each round. Deciding on a calibre is likely to be the easier choice, because you already have a gun that takes a particular calibre. Whilst a lot of people recommend using home-made ammunition in an old, less expensive gun to start with, my advice is actually the opposite. Make ammunition for the gun that you have the most experience with, whether it be a 9mm or a .380 . Firing home-made rounds through a gun you have plenty of experience with means that you are able to feel the difference between your rounds and shop-bought bullets much more easily, and make adjustments as necessary. Second, you’re going to need to choose the components for your bullets. If that sounds intimidating, it’s worth reminding yourself of how bullets actually work, and remembering that in essence they are quite simple devices. Each consists of essentially three components – the brass casing on the outside, the powder that goes inside this, and the actual bullet tip itself. Picking the perfect combination of these parts will depend on a vast variety of factors, from what you are using your rounds for, what is available in your area, to simply the rounds that your gun prefers. Once you’ve got a bit of experience making rounds, you will find your own favorite components. But even then, each part is relatively cheap if you buy in bulk, so it is easy to experiment with different types of each. Whilst the major one-off expense of making your own ammunition is the reloading press, which I will come to below, also note that for each calibre of bullet you are going to make, you need a “ die ”. A couple of dies by Hornady This is a small piece of metal that acts as a guide for putting all of the parts of the bullet together, and the range available is quite staggering. Most reloading presses come with a set of dies, but again you might want to experiment to find the set of dies that works for you. "Don’t Hurt Yourself" Sounds easy, right? Well, if done correctly making your own rounds is pretty easy, and can be quite safe, but you need to know what you are doing. You are working with live explosives, after all. Most accidents with home-made bullets are caused by adding too little, or too much, powder. These defective bullets are called squibs , but don’t let the cutesy name fool you – they can be deadly. You don’t want this happening Add too little powder, and the bullet will not generate enough power to get the round out of your barrel. If you pull the trigger again, thinking the round has gone off, or ( even worse ) if you are firing on automatic, the next bullet will smash into the one stuck in the casing. This is a great way to destroy a gun. Seriously, if this happens there is a good chance your gun will be dead. :(:( Adding too much powder is even worse. In this case, the bullet will explode within your gun, almost certainly causing significant damage, likely blowing your gun to pieces, and potentially costing you a hand. I don’t mean to scare you by talking about this, of course. It’s just a friendly reminder that you need to pay attention to what you are doing. My recommendation, if you are new to making your own rounds, would be to ask a professional, or an experienced friend, to take you through the process. In addition, for your first bullets make sure you use a light powder, so that even if you overfill your casings slightly, you are not going to accidentally make a bomb . Types of Reloading Press All those warnings out of the way, let’s take a look at the central part of any bullet manufacturing process – the reloading press. O and C Presses There are basically two types of reloading press: single-stage (or “turret”) presses, and progressive presses . A turret press is the most basic type of press. It consists of a metal frame,in which your bullet is mounted. When you pull the lever, a ram presses the primer and powder into the bullet casing, and pushes the whole assembly into a die. With this type of press, each stage of making the bullet is done in sequence, and you make one bullet at a time. Great image showing the difference between the two A progressive press is a more complicated device. These presses automate more of the steps of making the bullet, so that every time you pull the lever the press can perform quite a number of individual actions. They work like an assembly line, so that each time they move a bullet is moved onto the next stage of manufacture. They range from relatively simple devices, little more than a turret press, right up to machines that can do almost everything. With a progressive press, each time you pull the lever the machine can be performing a huge number of actions, like: Removing the primer from the used brass casing you inserted, “Resizing” the casing by reshaping it (within limits) so that it is the correct shape and size for the calibre you are loading, Placing a new primer into a casing, Dropping powder into a casing, “Belling” the casing so that a bullet can be placed into it, Pushing the bullet into the casing so that the finished round is at the correct overall length, Crimping the edges of the casing around the bullet, to hold the round together. For this reason, these presses are a little harder to work with than simple turret presses. That said, watching an experienced user operate a progressive press, with dozens of parts working together, is a thing of beauty. Choosing a Reloading Press When it comes to choosing between a simple turret press and a progressive press, there is a standard recommendation – beginners should always get a turret press, because they are easy to work with. This is rubbish. The received wisdom says that, for a beginner, turret presses are better because you can pay attention to each bullet as you make it. With this type of press, people say, you are less likely to forget a key step, and each bullet you make will be a finely-crafted item, because you’ve spent a lot of time on it. This might be true, of course, for the first dozen rounds you make. However, I hope that you are going to be super, extra careful with those rounds anyway. And trust me – using a turret press to make anything more than a hundred rounds is a real hassle. This is not necessarily because the press itself is slow. It is more to do with having to fetch a new casing from the box, carefully position it in the press, load the powder by hand, then pulling the handle, then removing the bullet. Dropping casings quickly gets really tiresome. 4 Best Reloading "Presses Available Today" And so, all those musings out of the way, it’s time to choose your progressive press. As with everything to do with firearms, the best press for you will depend on your individual requirements, and your budget. However, I’ll take you through a few options that are good choices for beginners, more experienced re-loaders, and finally the experts among you. Best Reloading Press For Beginners – "Dillon Square Deal" B If this is your first foray into making your own ammunition, my advice would be to get a Dillon Square Deal B . It’s a bit cheaper than the other presses below, but is a solid piece of machinery that also comes with a lifetime guarantee. The speed achieved by this press, once you get used to it, rivals that of more expensive presses, and the relatively simple mechanisms used mean that you can easily see if something goes wrong. In addition, it has a big advantage for those who are new to producing their own bullets – its compact size. It won’t take up your whole workbench, so you can play around without making a huge space investment. That said, there are some drawbacks. This press can only be used to load pistol calibers, and is only available in widely-used calibers. If you want to load rifle rounds, look elsewhere, but in all other respects this is a respectable press to start on. Best Mid-Range Reloading Press In truth, though, I would recommend starting with a mid-range reloading press. I promise you that, once you start making your own ammunition, you will quickly want to expand your operation. This means making more rounds more quickly, of course, but also the ability to produce rounds in different calibers when required. Mid-range progressive presses allow you to do this, for only a few hundred dollars more. A press like the Dillon RL 550B , the XL 650 , or a Hornady Lock-N-Load AP will allow you to make 500-600 rounds an hour. Extensions for these presses also allow you to quickly and easily swap between calibers when required. They also form a good platform for building a more professional press, because you can get extensions to do things like checking the powder level, or removing crimping. They are, of course, a little more complicated to set up and use, but a bit of research and help from an experienced friend will quickly overcome that difficulty. Best High-Volume Press If you plan to make thousands of rounds a year, of course, it’s worth investing in a serious press. These can cost thousands of dollars, but you get a lot for your money. A press like the "Dillon Super 1050" is capable of producing 1,000 rounds an hour, even on manual operation, and can form the basis of a truly professional reloading system. Beyond the extra functions that these top-end presses perform, they also incorporate features to make your ammo more reliable and safe. By automating almost every step in the bullet-making process , they take away a lot of the worry of preparing incorrectly-made cartridges. And, of course, high-end presses like this are designed to work with automated systems , so you can easily add a powered mechanism to make your press even faster. Automation Once you are experienced at making your own bullets, the next natural step is to automate your press. By adding a powered drive to your press, you will not need to manually crank a handle, and this ultimately makes the press easier to use, if not necessarily faster. There are plenty of automation devices available for almost every part of your press, from those that simply pull the handle for you, to those which automatically load new casings into your machine. The mid-range and high-end presses mentioned above are designed to work with this kind of mechanism. Your options in terms of automation are quite diverse, from simple powered cranks to control sensors that incorporate touch-screen readouts and sensors to pick up any problems during reloading. For the Dillon 1050 recommended above, two of the most popular automation devices are the Mark VII and the Ammobot . Main Advantages of a Progressive Press The reasons to get a progressive press stem from the reasons you want to make your own ammunition in the first place. I’m going to bet that, if you are even considering making your own ammunition, you are already an experienced shooter who fires off hundreds of rounds a month. If you want to make your own bullets, you want to make a few thousand a year. Scale For this reason, it makes sense to get the fastest type of press you can, right from the beginning. Whilst getting a turret press is a lot cheaper than even a basic progressive press, in the long run it will save you a lot of time. And even if you don’t think you are going to be making thousands of rounds now, think about the future. Getting a decent reloading press will mean that, for many years to come, you are able to make exactly the type of ammunition you need. Safety That said, progressive presses do take some time to get used to . Each time you pull the lever, you are going to need to check each of the four or five bullets that are in the process of being made, and make sure that each action has been completed properly. For a beginner, this can be quite a complex task, and it is for this reason that most people would recommend you start with a turret press. I think, though, they are overlooking an obvious way around this problem – just because a progressive press will perform three, four, or five actions each time you pull the lever, you don’t actually have to have bullets loaded at each stage. You can just as easily follow one bullet through each stage, and doing this is exactly like at … turret press. Except easier, and safer. So you can use a progressive press like a turret press, but not the other way around. To my mind, this makes a progressive press the obvious choice. Speed As I said before, once you get some experience a progressive press is simply much faster than a turret press. A good progressive press, in the right hands , can produce 300-600 rounds an hour , in comparison to a mere 100 for a turret press. Whilst carefully hand-crafting each bullet, spending a minute or more on each, might sound romantic at the beginning, once you are making a thousand rounds a year you will really come to appreciate the speed of a progressive press. Changing Calibers There is another huge advantage of progressive presses, and it comes when you need to change the caliber of bullet you are making. Each die you load into your press is good for a particular caliber, and if you change caliber you need to change the die. My progressive press setup in the garage Now. On a turret press, this is a hassle. You will need to partially disassemble the press, install the new die, and then make sure it is installed correctly. A good progressive press, on the other hand, will allow you to have all your dies installed at once, and swap between the pretty easily. This means that after you install and adjust them, you will only need to check that they are still true and functioning correctly. This makes loading different calibers in the same sitting much, much easier. It also reduces errors caused by incorrectly-installed dies, making your ammunition more reliable and safer. "Our Final Thoughts" Once you’ve armed yourself with a bit of knowledge, and have purchased a good reloading press, you are ready to start making your own ammunition. However, this is only the start of a long and enjoyable journey. As your practise and skill at making ammunition increases, there are a range of workshop tools and accessories that are available to make your work quicker and more professional, and you will quickly find what works for you. I know guys, for instance, who swear by a particular brand and size of caliper, and who would not even consider changing. And once you’ve made a few bullets, I guarantee that you want to experiment. There is a huge range of different casings, weights, and shapes available today, all of which can affect the accuracy and power of a round, and with your new reloading press you can try them all. Happy experimenting! Related Reads: Hearing Protection For Shooters Best Glasses For Shooting Best Shooting Chronograph Units Shooting Protection For Competitive Shooters Running And Gunning Shooting Cowboy Action Shooting Shooting Skills With Paintball Best Shooting Rests The Shooting Range The Vegas Shooting 5/5 (1 Review) Chris Browning Hey everyone I'm Chris. Founder and editor at Gun News Daily. This site was originally started by my father who passed it on to me. "Gun News Daily" has been reporting on gun news and conservative politics since 2001. We are the original gun news source. Life-long Second Amendment Supporter. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply

DIY: Beer Can Alcohol Stove

DIY: Beer Can Alcohol Stove

Looking for a light, inexpensive, DIY alternative for boiling water while backpacking or camping? Have you bugged in without heat and power? Have you bugged out to find that your manufactured stove has broken? From the casual traveled to the hardcore prepper, the alcohol stove is a fun, handy, and ingenious little piece of technology to master, and one that can come in extremely helpful, from a tight situation to a major catastrophe.  It performs well at colder temperatures or higher altitudes, an obstacle that plagues many commercial stoves. Quick Navigation Do It Yourself Stove Materials: The Steps Disadvantages/Dangers Do It Yourself Stove The beer can alcohol stove burns in near silence, and can function as a primary stove or an excellent back up option should one’s primary stove fail.  Its simplicity allows it an incredible reliability, with more or less a zero percent rate of failure, and it does not require specialized fuel canisters, as the alcohol it burns can be carried safely in something as simple as a plastic soda bottle. There are countless different designs for alcohol stoves, but I find that this particular style rises quickly above the rest. It is cheap and easy to construct, taking only 5-10 minutes, and in all but extreme cases does not require an additional apparatus to support your pot or pan without extinguishing the flame.  It can also hold a considerable amount of fuel compared to other designs, is extremely simple to fill up and extinguish, and allows the user to recover the unused fuel for later use. Materials: 1 Beer or Soda Can: A standard 12oz can works just fine, though I most prefer the stout, 25.4oz Foster’s beer cans, sometimes called Oil Cans. Not only does the larger can grant one leeway with cuts and dimensions, but also allows for building a slightly deeper well to contain more fuel. The aluminum is a bit thicker, and thus studier, and the wider top allows more stability and balance when using larger pots or pans, which comes in handy if you are cooking meals rather than boiling water. For our demonstration, however, we will use a standard 16oz can, as they are more commonly known and found. Knife, Scissors, or Leatherman Supertool: The entire stove can be created with just a knife, however it is most conveniently done with a Leatherman or other like super tool, as the scissors facilitate more clean and easy cuts. Fuel: This stove will work OK on 91% Isopropyl Rubbing Alcohol , but runs ideally off of 95% Grain Alcohol or 99% Denatured Alcohol for a cleaner, hotter burning stove. 91% Isopropyl can be found and purchased at most pharmacies for around $3-$5 for a 32oz bottle. In thirty-degree weather at sea level, it took upward of fifteen minutes to boil two cups of water on just under ½ cup or 120ml of fuel.  The Isopropyl also leaves a thick, black soot residue when burned.  Denatured alcohol can be found and purchased online or at most hardware stores for around $7-$10 for a 1qt can. In thirty-degree weather at sea level, it took about five minutes to boil two cups of water on ¼ cup, or 60ml of fuel. It leaves no residue or soot when burned, but burns with an invisible flame, requiring even more vigilance and attention. Grain Alcohol, such as the 95% Everclear, is available at most liquor stores around $30 for 1.75L. In thirty-degree weather at sea level, it took about five and a half minutes to boil two cups of water on ¼ cup, or 60ml. It leaves no residue or soot when burned. Combustion: Matches, a lighter , or any other source of flame is acceptable. The Steps Step 1: Remove the can’s top.  Using your knife, carefully work the blade into the indented ring that runs around the drinking surface of the can. As you cut, work your way out from the indented ring until you are cutting right up against the outer ring. Take care not to dent,  damage, or puncture the can. Take your time, and take care to cut safely away from yourself and others. Once finished, the top should fall right into the body of the can. Take a moment to cut out whatever is left of the top, leaving a nice, clean opening at the top. Step 2: Cut the can.  A 16oz can is generally about 6” long. I usually aim to cut 3.5” down from the top, so that the bottom piece is 2.5” and the top 3.5”.  A 12oz can is roughly 5” long, so aim for a ratio of about 3” for the top to 2” for the bottom. Mark this spot on your can, and then, using your knife point, carefully puncture a small hole in the can’s side, taking care not to dent or compromise the can’s integrity. Next, take your scissors and cut the can as neatly and evenly into two pieces as possible. Once it’s in two pieces, again use your scissors to clean any burs or slivers.  This is best done by cutting towards the inside of the can, allowing a smooth, burr free cut.  Don’t fret if your measurements aren’t exact, the stove should still work fine. This is just a useful guide. There are varied opinions on the optimum size, but what is most important is that the bottom of the can sits just at the edge of the top’s tapered neck once assembled. Step 3: Vent the Can.  Take a moment to wipe out any remaining liquid or residue in your can. Next, take the top piece, put your pointer and middle finger together, and insert the two fingers in through the opening, pressing them gently against the can’s interior wall.  GENTLY and CAREFULLY press the blade of your knife against the outside of the can, aiming it as though it would pass directly in between your two fingers should the can not be there to stop it from doing so.  Using gentle pressure, primarily from your fingers in the can rather than the hand holding the knife, create a neat, indented ridge that runs from the bottom up to the edge of the can’s tapered neck.  The indent should be far larger on the bottom, and only slight at the top. Rotate the can towards you, so that the first indent is now below your middle finger, and the space between your fingers is lined up again to make your next indent. Repeat this process all the way around, using one finger as your spacing guide. The vents should space themselves out about evenly all the way around this way, but again, don’t fret if they don’t come out perfect.  These ridges act as vents once the stove is fully constructed, allowing the alcohol fumes to filter up through them and burn. Once this step has finished, the top portion of the can should slide easily into the bottom. Step 4: Add an Air Intake.  Pick a spot on the can’s tapered neck, and place your finger gently behind it. Place the tip of your knife, a thumbtack, or anything with a point against the spot, and twist it gently back and forth. Do not apply much pressure, as you want to avoid puncturing anything more than the slightest hole in your can, or your finger. Once you feel the point has come through, you are set. This little guy will act as your stove’s oxygen intake. Step 5: Build a Windscreen. Alcohol stoves are particularly susceptible to wind, which is something you can expect to come across in all but the most ideal settings. It is a good idea to take the few extra minutes to build a simple windscreen to optimize your stove’s function.  All you need to build one is some basic tin foil, which can be found most anywhere for around $3-$4 a roll. Ideally, about 6 paperclips will complete your materials list.  First, stretch out the appropriate length of foil. When complete, you want there to be about a ½ inch of space between the edge of your pot and the windscreen all around, so consider that when building your screen.  I generally err on the side of a few extra inches, which allows the screen to be adjusted to accommodate a variety of sizes.  Once it’s stretched out, flatten it out as smooth as possible. This is something that will be done repeatedly to avoid air pockets forming in your stove, which will expand the screen when the stove is lit.  Fold the edges over about a ½ inch on each side, and smooth them flat. Next, fold the foil in half, and line up the bottom edge of the sheet with the bottom edge of the top fold. Again, smooth it as flat as possible.  Lastly, fold the top and side edges over once more, and smooth them flat.  Next, form a circle with the screen by bringing the two ends together, and secure it on each side. Lastly, secure the other four clips on the screen’s bottom, spaced evenly apart and leaving about a ½ inch of the clip protruding. These clips will act as legs or stands that allow airflow to reach the stove while blocking the force of the wind.  A windscreen can be successful without paperclips, by simply puncturing a few small holes around the screen, similar to the air intake in your stove. A standard foil windscreen will last roughly 10-12 days with an average use of 2-3 times per day. Step 6: Light her up!  Congratulations, your stove is complete! Now let’s test her out. First, pour your fuel into the stove.  You will find that it doesn’t take much to get her going, but how much fuel you need will be determined by how much water you need to boil, or how large the meal is you plan to cook. The more you use the stove, the faster you will come up with an idea of how much fuel to use in each situation. Once the fuel is in the stove, tilt it slightly, taking care not to spill, and strike your lighter near the surface of the fuel. It should light up instantly. Once it’s lit, give it a moment, and the flame will soon pour out your vents all the way around to form one unified flame.  You can now boil water, cook a meal, or even warm your hands if you need! Step 7 :  Put Her Out.  The only way to extinguish the stove is to smother its oxygen supply. Blowing on it will only risk spattering burning fuel around. Using a small container, simply cover the stove quickly and snuff out its oxygen supply. The flame will extinguish almost instantly.  Once extinguished, the stove is safe to touch within a minute. Take care to test it first all the same! Once cooled, remove the top piece, and pour the remaining fuel back into your fuel container from the bottom. It can be reused indefinitely.  I typically use a plastic container that serves double duty as a snuff cap as well as a storage container for the stove. Also Read: DIY Charcoal Water Filter Disadvantages/Dangers Because the stove is unsealed, there is the inherent risk of knocking over and spilling burning alcohol , leading to burns. In the case of the denatured alcohol, the fuel burns with a near invisible flame, making it hard to detect. Be sure to have a snuff cap of some kind to extinguish the stove, and take great care and awareness at all times while using one.  In general, the stove will work optimally for one or two people. The larger the cooking task, the longer and less efficient it will be. But it will get the job done nonetheless.  While it is incredibly light, it does require more fuel to be carried for long distance trips, as it burns almost double the amount of propane or butane stoves.  The trick is to just experiment, and you will find your own system in time! About Joshua Valentine: A lifelong outdoors and survival expert, Josh combines years of backcountry experience  with a lifetime of unique and inventive fitness training, designed to prepare the body and mind for the rigors of the wilderness.  Josh holds certifications as a Wilderness First Responder (WFR), American Canoe Association Whitewater Raft Guide (ACA), and Personal Trainer (AFAA).  He is also a recorded Adirondack 46′r and White Mountain 4,000 Footer. All Photos By Author Other interesting articles: DIY: Five Gallon Bucket Washing Machine Solo Stove Lite Review (2020): Is this A Good Survival Stove? MSR Whisperlite vs Esbit Pocket Stove Survival Gear Review: Vargo Titanium Wood Stove

5 Best Shooting Glasses STUNNING Reviews [Updated]

5 Best Shooting Glasses  STUNNING Reviews [Updated]

One of the most important, yet often overlooked piece of safety equipment for the shooting is shooting glasses. These crucial pieces of eyewear not only are designed to offer extensive protection from accidents caused by failed rounds or even worse, failed guns or ricochets, but also are often tinted to promote greater optical clarity and accuracy when shooting. Such a simple product should be relatively easy to make and sell, yet the market is awash with nearly identical competing products. This can make selecting a good pair of shooting glasses difficult, and choosing the quality from the junk can be difficult. My Favourite Wiley X Saber Advanced Remington T-72 Jackson Safety V30 Come with all 3 lenses Better contrast in foggy/misty conditions Great Fit, Tight and Secure Check Price Check Price Check Price Wiley X Saber Advanced Come with all 3 lenses Check Price My Favourite Remington T-72 Better contrast in foggy/misty conditions Check Price Jackson Safety V30 Great Fit, Tight and Secure Check Price Picking the best shooting glasses requires not only knowing what your particular needs are (do you wear glasses? Plan to hunt?) but also knowing if your shooting glasses are even made to common safety standards. We went ahead and went through hundreds of eye protection for shooting reviews, so you don’t have to. We want to make sure that your safety glasses are made with the common safety standards for shooting. The top 5 picked best shooting glasses color are for sure have passed our standard for safety. We make sure that question of yours: what are the best shooting glasses ? is answered right here. BEST SHOOTING GLASSES AND EYEWEAR 2019 That said, figuring out which are the best shooting glasses can be a difficult and confusing task. That is why we have put together a list of the 5 best shooting glasses, highlighting what each one does best. Then we provide a helpful buyer’s guide. Product Name Presses Speciality Wiley X Saber Advanced Shooting Glasses (Editor’s Choice) Single Stage Presses Bullet Swaging Check Price Lee Precision Cast Press "Single Stage Presses" Heavy Duty Construction Check Price LEE PRECISION Turret Press Turret Press "Heavy Duty Construction" Check Price Lyman Reloading Press Turret Press Pistol Reloading Check Price Hornady Lock-N-Load Five-Station Press Large-Capacity Hopper Check Price Dillon Precision Reloading Machine 4 Stage Progressive Load Both Rifle and Pistol Check Price Best tactical shooting glasses Wiley X Saber Advanced Matte Black Frame with Grey, Light... The Wiley X SABER ADVANCED features a lightweight design, flexible... BUILT TO ADAPT TO YOUR EVER-CHANGING ENVIRONMENT, OUR CHANGEABLE... UNPARALLELED PROTECTION: Founded on a commitment to protect, Wiley X... LENS TECHNOLOGY: Wiley X sunglass lenses provide 100% UVA/UVB... PRESCRIPTION READY: Almost every Wiley X frame can be filled with a... Check Price Oof. These are nice glasses. Almost too nice, we argued over who got to take them home, which proves that the best eye protection for shooting can be stylish and affordable. The smoked wraparound UV blocking lenses, shatterproof construction, and extremely comfortable nylon frame sold us on these little gems of shooting glasses. As an added bonus, these can be had in much popular for shooting colors like amber, yellow and clear, ensuring that pretty much anyone can get the shooting glasses that work best for them. We looked these over with a mind for utility and durability since they are in that sweet spot of either a little too pricey for what they are or a good deal. We found that they are in fact a solid set of shooting glasses for the money and well worth adding to your range bag. As a downside, we think these may obscure too much peripheral vision for some shooters. The wraparound design is crucial for proper eye protection, but it is possible to have too much of a good thing. If you have trouble with your peripheral vision, you probably want to take a look at some of the other shooting glasses we review here. However, if you spend a lot of time outdoors and need a more extreme lens design with UV protection, these will be just the ticket for you. All told, it’s hard to go wrong with these shooting glasses, especially with the multiple lens colors available. It is made with a polycarbonate lens that is ultra thick. You can find almost double thickness compared to standard safety glasses. Also, it comes with outstanding quality as you find best safety glasses for shooting. Pros Distortion free, gray/clear/rust lenses able to handle any tasks efficiently. Easy and simple to change the temple lenses. Perfectly work in the desert. Wonderful product at a great price. Cons Black glass not suitable for night use. Nose piece would be clear to make them invisible. Best anti fog shooting glasses Remington T-72 Shooting Glasses (Smoke Lens) Smoke Lens Lens provides 99.9% UV protection. Impact resistant polycarbonate lens meets or exceeds all ANSI Z87.1+... Wraparound lens provides unobstructed view. Scratch resistant hard coat lens Check Price We’ve all done it, in fact, every single one of us looking for the best eye protection for shooting has admitted to going out to the range without safety glasses. Some of us wear prescription lenses and rely on them more than is safe, while all of us admitted to just being lazy sometimes. However, laziness and cutting corners is a lousy and dangerous way to shoot, and it is fortunate that modern firearms are also incredibly safe. That is no excuse to not bring shooting glasses along, and the T-72 quickly became one of our favorites due to their high-quality construction, wraparound lenses and incredible levels of personal comfort when worn. The primary downside to these glasses is their clear color. It’s a well-known fact that amber or orange tinted lenses increase the contrast between objects, and can enhance shooting performance. Of course, not all shooters perceive things the same way, and not all circumstances call for tinted lenses. However, as long as the lack of tinting isn’t an issue, these affordable and highly rated glasses are some of the best eye protection for shooting when used at the range or out in the field while hunting. Another great use for these would be as spares and loaner glasses, because invariably when you get to the range, one of your buddies forgot something, so it never hurts to have spare safety gear. Grab one or two pairs and see how these well-made shooting glasses work for you. The reasonable price insists you consider Best Shooting Glasses for the money. Because it offers great protection compared to its cheap price. It is very flexible glass to serve your purpose. Pros Very comfortable glass and well fit into your nose and face. Smoke lens most for indoor activities also perfect for outdoor shooting and commuting. Plastic frame and soft rubber nose piece are good combinations. Protect your eyes 99.9% from UV rays and make safe. Cons The ear piece is not adjustable but well come off if you want to replace them. A Little bit flimsy but able to serve shooting purpose. Best safety glasses for shooting Jackson Safety V30 Nemesis Indoor/Outdoor Lens Safety... Sleek, sporty, flexible, lightweight design Soft-touch temples for added comfort Single lens wrap-around protection Includes free neck cord Available in reader style lenses Check Price Despite the high reviews, we weren’t sure if these would be some of the best eyewear protection for shooting that we’d run across. However, a quick trip to the range proved us wrong. These reasonably priced shooting glasses come in a convenient twelve pack, making them ideal for gun clubs, spaces for group shootings, Christmas stocking stuffers, or even something to markup a bit and sell in a gun store. They come in a nice assortment of colors and tints, ensuring that a shooter can get whatever color they like best, and offer both front and side protection, making them rather suitable as safety glasses on or off the range. Designed to meet ANSI standards for personal eye protection, these glasses are also bundled with a lanyard, adding to their functionality. Now while we gave them our seal of approval for the best eyewear protection for shooting, it is important to note that these are generic safety glasses first and shooting glasses somewhat second. They will work for shooting, and quite well, but the primary market is bulk purchasers like construction companies or shooting ranges. That said, if you need high-quality shooting glasses in bulk, and are after something a bit nicer and trendier than the usual run of the mill shooting glasses, by all means, grab a dozen or two of these. The cost per unit is low, and sometimes no amount of money in the world will buy back an eye injured in a shooting accident. It is suitable for both men and women. It is perfect for construction, manufacturing, gun shooting/shooting range. The reasonable price with best quality glass is the perfect combination to satisfying your needs. Pros Very comfortable glass and well fit into your nose and face. Smoke lens most for indoor activities also perfect for outdoor shooting and commuting. Plastic frame and soft rubber nose piece are good combinations. Protect your eyes 99.9% from UV rays and make safe. Cons The ear piece is not adjustable but well come off if you want to replace them. A Little bit flimsy but able to serve shooting purpose. Best color shooting glasses Radians SH500CS Shift Black Frame/Clear, Copper, Amber,... Field tested to ensure maximum performance and protection Manufactured in ISO-certified factories Comfortable and durable Country Of Origin : China Check Price The wonderful out looking Radians shift interchange shooting glasses have 5 identical lenses that perfectly fit for any conditions. It is able to provide you great pleasure for your range session. The 5 different color mirrors give you ultra protection from the different light condition. Green mirror lens is able to protect you from bright sunlight. The copper lens is for moderate light, an orange lens for limiting eye strain, amber light for increased visibility in low light conditions. The copper lens is also able to increase your depth perception. Clear lens is most suitable for night and indoor use. It can block 99.9% from the sun’s UVA and UVB rays and beat ANSI Z87.1 standards. It is highly recommended to purchase this shooting glass. It is much nicer, bit expensive but worth investment and you find multiple lenses is the best glasses for shooting. It has slip resistance mechanism made with soft rubber-tipped temples. It comes with an essential kit including excellent carrying case, lens cloths, extra nose pieces and foam padded compartment Pros Fast and easy to changes the lenses as the condition changes. Smart case included. Very comfortable to wear this lens. Work great with ear muffs. Cons The case size needs to be improved need bit bigger size. Need to introduce vermilions/purple lens for optimal clarity for clays. Budget shooting glasses Duco Night-vision Glasses Polarized Night Driving Men's... 【DUCO POLARIZED YELLOW LENSES】 - Can reduce glare from the... 【Lens:TAC polarized lens, UV400 protection】It is impact resistance... 【BEST LIGHT ENHANCING LENS TINT (Pale Yellow Lenses)】 - Enhance... 【HOW TO TEST FOR POLARIZING GLASSES?】- 1--Put the glasses in front... 【30 DAY MONEY BACK GUARANTEE】 - All DUCO customers enjoy 30 Day... Check Price This particular glass is able to serve a wide range of purposes. It is a functional glass that helps you from night vision, prescription, sports cycling glasses. You can consider this glass as the best prescription shooting glasses on the market. Duco men’s shooting glasses for sporting clays have an anti-blue ray radiation protection mechanism. You can find this glass polarized glasses and protect up to UV400. It is excellent quality products with outstanding value for the money. It ensures maximum safety during driving time. You can use this glass for multipurpose for indoor and outdoor activities. The frame made of strong aluminum alloy ensure much stronger than the traditional metal frame. It is also very lightweight for your convenient use. It has night vision lens that able to reduce night driving glare and eye strain. It also has color clarity mechanism and optical definition. You can perfectly drive at night time, cloudy sky, rainy day or even foggy weather. Pros Will not be broken if the lens hits with a hammer. Offer 100% harmful sun’s UV rays protection. Impact resistance mechanism is installed with the lens. Anti-reflective lens for maximum comfort. Cons The driving night glare mechanism needs to be improved. Anti-reflection coating needs to be installed properly next time. "Best Shooting Glasses" – Buyer’s Guide How to select the Best shooting glasses? Not only do shooting glasses provide eye protection but they as well enhance a shooter’s or hunter’s view of their target. This is why it is a mandatory for shooters participating in a shooting competition to wear impact resistant glasses. Since there are hundreds of shooting safety glasses available in the market, choosing the best can be challenging. In the next paragraph, we have highlighted some of the vital features and factors you should consider in selecting the top shooting glasses for your purpose or designated environment. Why should you choose Best Shooting Glasses? All right, here’s the honest thing. Accident happens before you knew it. How many hunters you know have been eye damaged out of muzzle flash? How many have burned their eyes from the devastating blow of powder? Hope you knew no one, but the fact is there are many hunters out there that are hit accidentally by a ricochet, or even an errant birdshot. Your eyes are needed to be protected as much as every vital part in your body. If earmuffs are made for your hearing protection, then prescription shooting glasses are designed for your sight protection, make use of it. Make sure the eyewear you will buy is a perfect fit for your head size. This will also protect your eyes from excess cartridges are ejected from the weaponry you are carrying. Aside from having a guaranteed protection from shooting in the actual field, it also supports and protects your sight, while you’re out there looking for a target. In the shootingaz, there will always be environmental hazards. Trust us, we experienced encountering a tough twig that has left me and my friends scars on our faces. What’s we highly thank for that day, is that we wore our best shooting glasses, so instead of the twigs damaging our eyes, it went to our faces. What angle we want you to look at is that in the shootingaz, it will be a wooded area. Saw real forest on a movie? That’s what we’re talking about. The stray leaves, branches, twigs, and dust can damage your eyes. Our biggest tip, always make use of your shooting glasses. Also, when cleaning your gun, it’s always a safety tip that you wear shooting glasses to protect your eyes from the cleaning springs and solvents from the gun that may come loose. All right, so aside from these reasons we have laid out for you, we also wanted you to know that the shooting glasses are important for they can help you target better. The thing is, some glasses can produce quality contrast when shooting. For instance, if you bought yellow glasses, they will turn the white on a black and white target yellow, thus improving the shooter’s accuracy and precision. The step that is very crucial for you to take is not to read a lot of best glasses for shooting reviews , but to select a perfect shooting glasses that will suit perfectly based on your head size and the contrast color you need for better shooting. Impact-resistant safety glasses First of all, shooting glasses should be impact resistant. This feature comes with the lenses and it is rated by several agencies. The most notable rating agency is the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). It recommends at least a rating of Z87.1 plus (ANSI Z871+). Also, the glasses should be designed in a way that ensures they cover much of your eyes. Furthermore, a great and common feature found in almost all shooting safety glasses is that they are made from polycarbonate material. Polycarbonate is a strong material and ensures the longevity of the glasses. In addition, every type is able to offer at least 99.9% protection from dangerous UVA-UVB light. What colour’s of Shooting glasses should I get? For greater performance of the shooting glasses, lens tints can be a crucial factor. Different colors or tints play different roles and are applied in varying environments by hunters or shooters as discussed below: Orange safety glasses: the orange tint helps to bar out blue light and haze and in the long run giving a better orange target. It is suitable for shooting orange clay targets and is used by many shooters. Pale yellow: the role of this tint is to brighten and contrast colors in low level lighting, which can be used at sunrise, sunset or in the evenings under artificial light. Similar to orange, this tint can be found in many protective glasses. Medium yellow lens: it is suitable for contrasts in dim light or when overcast. It is also desirable for enhancing orange clay targets. Clear: Colorless or clear tints come with a mirror coating that lowers glare and reflects light. It is ideal for use in both indoor and outdoor areas. Light purple: this color provides a clear contrast to the orange of the target. It emphasizes on a background of tall trees, as it is likely to dampen the green of the foliage and at the same time better the orange of the clay target. Dark purple: It works perfectly in snow and at a place with bright sunlight as it highly betters orange in the sky and lowers glare. Cooper polarized: this tint is suitable for shooting when there is bright sunlight and the target lies on a green background. This is because the blue light is blocked and contrast increased Brown lens: this tint is ideal for game hunters as it identifies the brown color of game birds and reduces light. It is used mostly during bright days when there is too much of a glare against an open background Grey/smoke safety glasses: this is another commonly used tint. It blocks glare and is ideal for using in the bright light area. Vermillion: this is a widely used tint which performs outstandingly in poorly lit backgrounds, like in the presence of trees. It is great for any person with red to green color blindness. Conclusion Shooting glasses don’t need to be complicated or uncomfortable. Modern eye protection is both affordable and easy to wear and is made to accommodate every imaginable sort of setting and need, from active combat in the Mid East to an afternoon shooting at cans with an air rifle or a pistol. There are published standards that help keep you safe and ensure you are buying a quality product that will actually protect your eyes in case of an accident, and any number of colored lenses that will enhance your shooting experience or simply make it more comfortable. Modern synthetic materials have given us lightweight and easy wearing frames and lenses, and top-notch shooting glasses are available to fit any budget and any price point. If you are shopping for your first set of shooting glasses or simply looking to get a new or even better set, we’ve got the best shooting glasses right here for you to look over! Contents BEST SHOOTING GLASSES AND EYEWEAR 2019 Best tactical shooting glasses Best anti fog shooting glasses Best safety glasses for shooting Best color shooting glasses Budget shooting glasses Best Shooting Glasses "– Buyer’s Guide" How to select the Best shooting glasses? Why should you choose Best Shooting Glasses? Impact-resistant safety glasses What colour’s of Shooting glasses should I get? Conclusion

Best .45 ACP Ammo [2020]: Home Defense & Target Practice

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Got a shiny .45 ACP pistol and want to feed it the best ? Popular .45 ACP Ammo Read on to see how we chose our recommendations of the best ammo for home defense and target shooting.  Plus a couple places to buy it for cheap! Table of Contents Loading... The Testing The .45 ACP is a slow moving but heavy round that is well-known for its stopping power.  1911 anyone? I like the popular adage…”the 9mm will kill the body, the .45 will kill the soul.” 9mm vs .45 ACP 9mm Kills Your Body The 9mm has caught up with new bullet technology, but there’s no disputing that a big fat round will still do some serious damage. Popular Pistol Calibers Testing Background One of our favorite places to buy ammo from, Lucky Gunner, ran an epic test of self defense ammo.  We condense it down into the absolute best .45 ACP ammo from the results. Here’s a brief overview of what they did which closely follows standard FBI procedures: Shot 10 feet away 4 layers of fabric in front of the ballistics gel to make for a “worst case” scenario of a really bundled up bad guy Gel with 4 Layers Ideal penetration of 12-18 inches. More than 18 inches might go completely through the baddie and hit something you didn’t intend on hitting.  While having a 12 inch minimum protects against thicker than usual targets and the possibility of hitting something before the torso. 5 shots for more data 5 Shots into Ballistic Gel More compact gun. Most tests are run with a full-sized pistol but Lucky Gunner used a compact Kahr CW45 with a 3.64″ barrel compared with a 5″ barrel of full-sized guns.  The reasoning is that most defensive situations might entail smaller guns and because of the smaller barrels, the velocity drops a little bit from the manufacturer’s data. Kahr CW45 While with other calibers that have more variance of standard bullet weights, we stuck with the most popular 230 gr .45 ACP round because it’s the weight that we shoot 100% of the time. Note, if you’re using a 1911 (and you should always try your self-defense ammo anyways), please test out a bunch of self defense ammo to make sure the jacketed hollow points (JHP) feed.  Some 1911’s are finicky and only like full metal jacket (FMJ/ball) ammo. .45 ACP Ball vs Hollowpoint And why JHP rounds for self-defense?  Expansion is always better since it transfers almost all of the energy into the baddie and prevents most over-penetration. Here are our suggestions: Best .45 ACP Ammo for Home Defense & Target Practice 1. Federal .45 ACP 230 gr HST Penetration depth is right in the 12-18″ sweet zone, with great expansion on all five rounds, and good velocity for a shorter barrel.  Since the penetration is an average of 14″, this round would likely be fine (no over-penetration) in longer barrels as well. My personal favorite brand (Federal HST) and what I use in my 9mm too. Average Penetration: 14″ Average Expansion: .85″ Average Velocity: 822 ft/sec Best .45 ACP Self-Defense Federal .45 ACP 230 gr HST 28 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 28 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Lucky Gunner (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing .45 ACP 230 gr HST What’s your take on the HST? Readers' Ratings 4.96/5 (453) Your Rating? 2. Speer .45 ACP 230 gr Gold Dot Penetration is slightly less than the HST which may suit it better for longer barrels.  Expansion is still great and velocity is slightly lower, which probably affects the penetration. Average Penetration: 12.9″ Average Expansion: .71″ Average Velocity: 752 ft/sec Speer .45 ACP 230 gr Gold Dot 25 at Palmetto State Armory Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 25 at "Palmetto State Armory" Compare prices (3 found) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Lucky Gunner (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Speer 230 gr Gold Dot 3. Federal .45 ACP +P Tactical Bonded LE If more pressure/velocity is the name of the game for you, I recommend this newer round.  Great penetration, awesome expansion, and slightly higher velocity due to the +P (but not by much).  Law Enforcement model. Average Penetration: 14.6″ Average Expansion: .86″ Average Velocity: 887 ft/sec Federal +P 230 gr Tactical Bonded LE 33.25 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 33.25 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing Federal 230 Tactical Bonded +P Expansion Now how about the best .45 ACP ammo for practice and the range ? I’ve shot a lot of .45 ACP through my 1911 and here are a few of my favorites that always fed well and went bang!  I stay with brass cased name brand ammo since I had bad luck with steel-cased and cheaper ammo. 4. American Eagle .45 ACP 230 gr Great deals last year but I feel there’s still a surplus.  So now I’m starting with AE first. Best .45 ACP Range Ammo American Eagle .45 ACP 230 gr 18 at Palmetto State Armory Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 18 at Palmetto State Armory Compare prices (3 found) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Lucky Gunner (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing 5. Blazer Brass .45 ACP 230 gr Usually the cheapest brass cased round in other calibers.  But always reliable and good to go.  Brass is a little hard to reload so it’s great if you are at a range or class where you can’t pick up spent brass. Blazer Brass .45 ACP 230 gr - 200 Rounds 58 at Palmetto State Armory Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 58 at Palmetto State Armory Compare prices (3 found) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Lucky Gunner (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing 6. PMC Bronze .45 ACP 230 gr My go to brand for range shooting ammo.  Sometimes ends up cheaper than Blazer and is great brass to reload. PMC .45 ACP 230 gr 18.25 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 18.25 at Lucky Gunner Compare prices (2 found) Lucky Gunner (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Conclusion If you want to see the full results from Lucky Gunner, check their post out here . So there you have it…our recommendations for the best self/home defense and range target shooting ammo. Let us know which ones you went with and how they run in your gun.  Or head to our Ammo & Reloading section for more! Want another one…check out our Best .45 ACP Pistols . More Popular Ammo Brands

Experience WWIIs First True Combat Rifles through .22 Replicas

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d27ebfdb_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d27ebfdb_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } German Sport Guns' StG44 (above) and Chiappa's M1-22 (below). There is one big barrier in collecting World War II era firearms — the price tag. But high quality .22 replicas have made stocking your gun safe with the finest guns of the Allies and Axis accessible. The First Assault Weapons As currently defined, an “Assault Rifle” is considered to be a lightweight battle arm firing a cartridge of intermediate power (somewhere between a pistol cartridge and a full-blown traditional battle rifle cartridge like the .30-06) capable of being fired in a semi-automatic or full automatic mode from a high capacity detachable box magazine. Most people consider the German StG44-Sturmgewehr 44, literally “storm (or assault) rifle, which fired the 7.92mm Kurz (short) cartridge to be the world’s first assault rifle under that definition. It was an outstanding weapon for that time, and was likely to have been at least in part, the progenitor of the Soviet AK-47. Fortunately for the world, Adolph Hitler, besides being a psychopath, was also a micromanaging psychopath. He believed that since the M98K bolt action rifle had been good enough for him in the First World War, it was good enough for his troops 25 years later in the Seccond World War. Development of this weapon had to be kept under wraps from him until it was perfected AND Germany was in such dire straits that a weapon of this type was needed to turn the tide of battle(s). Fortunately again, the allies had so severely interfered with the ability of Germany to manufacture what it needed that not enough of this revolutionary arm could be produced to have much effect on the outcome of the war. But there was another assault rifle that was invented before the Stg44 that made an impact, before it was even envisioned as a weapon of this type. Our very own M1 carbine. As many of you know, the M1 Carbine was designed originally to replace the .45 pistol as a more effective, yet easily carried weapon for rear echelon types, or specialty troops such as mortar crews. It provided much longer range accuracy and firepower than the great .45 did. But it was never intended to be fielded as a frontline. Or was it? Well, yes and no. There were other specialized troops that needed a weapon that was lighter and more compact than the M1 Garand or Thompson-so paratroopers were in line for the weapon-which was initially designed to have a selective fire feature. Apparently that feature was deleted by the military as being too costly, or slowing the initial development and fielding of the new weapon. "German Sport Guns" ' StG44 might be a .22, but hasn't lost its intimidation factor. It wasn’t until the War was drawing to a close that conversion kits were provided to make the M1 Carbines in the field full auto capable, while production of the M2 select fire carbine was undertaken stateside. The late addition of select fire capability was a direct response to our encounters with the few German troops that had been equipped with the StG44. So technically we COULD have fielded the select fire M2 carbine much earlier than we did, beating the German’s to the punch But typical stodgy military thinking may have also been involved in detouring the select fire capability as unnecessary. I say we won the race on a technicality. Related GunDigest Articles Magnum Research .22 Rifles Now Dressed in a New Stock SHOT Show: Great New Rifles for 2017 We definitely won on the intermediate cartridge concept. While the .30 carbine cartridge is often thought of as a wimp of a round, it really isn’t. Launching a 110gr. bullet at over 1990 fps, and developing 967 ft. lbs. of muzzle energy-basically three times that of the 9mm at the muzzle, it is certainly nothing I would want to get hit with. By contrast, the StG44’s 7.92×33 Kurtz, clearly the predecessor of the 7.62×39 AK47 round, launched a 125 grain bullet at 2250 fps for a muzzle energy of 1408 ft. lbs. Again, while the .30 Carbine lacks the ballistic potential of the 7.92 Kurtz, it is clearly in a ballistic class well above standard handgun cartridges. Again, the .30 Carbine qualifies as an assault rifle round, not only because of its ballistics, but because it was used as such throughout three plus Wars. .22 caliber makeovers The problem with both these weapons and their cartridges is that they aren’t available at reasonable cost or any cost that the average shooter can afford. Try $20,000 plus for an original StG44. Original M1’s in shootable condition are well into the $2000 range. While there are outstanding newly manufactured M1’s available from Kahr/Auto-Ordnance, there is still the issue of ammo cost. .30 Carbine ammo is somewhat pricey. Ball ammo runs around $23 for 50 rounds. Not horrible, but not cheap. Fortunately, the ability to have and shoot these two old war horses (or at least their stand-ins) at a very reasonable cost for both guns and ammo has arrived via two companies who are heavily invested in the burgeoning .22LR replica market. The Italian manufacturer Chiappa has given us the M1-22 .22LR M1 Carbine (sold through Century Arms and now available in a 9mm model), while Germany’s GSG (German Sport Guns) imported through American Tactical has given us the .22LR StG44. Both these guns are worth their fun, and maybe hunting and defensive weight, in gold. The .22 replica market has been a beautiful thing. The replicas I have worked with are often indistinguishable (without close examination by a trained eye) from the real thing. Remember the old .22LR M16 “replica” from the 1980’s? The only thing that vaguely resembled an M16 was the fact that it had a carry handle/sight and a triangular handguard. Any other resemblance To a real M16 was purely coincidental. Chiappa's M1-22 has the potential to be a slick camp rifle. Chiappa's M1-22 All that has changed. Let’s start with a closer look at the “American” entrant. The M1-22 is a dead ringer in the wood stock version to late war production “low wood” M1 Carbines. The stock is a very walnut appearing hardwood in a natural style low-gloss finish. The barrel and bolt are made of steel, while low stress components are polymer. Seriously, there really is a difference between polymer and plastic-quality polymer is very durable and it works well in terms of appearance and function on the M1-22. The late war style also features a faux bayonet lug (I tried a real M1 Carbine bayonet on the gun, it didn’t fit but it looked good). The magazine release is the correct style, and is in the correct location. The safety is the rotating lever style that replaced the original push button to avoid confusion with the magazine release button on early military M1’s. The charging handle can be locked to the rear with the small button found at the rear, just as the real M1. The bolt also stays open on the last shot. The polymer magazine has the same profile as the original and is entirely enclosed due to its 10 round capacity limit. No loading assist button is needed. The magazine locks in place in the same manner as the original. The rear sight is the same style as the late model adjustable carbine sight and the front sight is standard M1, plain blue-no fancy light gathering inserts. There is a slot in the stock that would accommodate an original carbine oiler and sling combo should you wish to add it, although the M1-22 is certainly no burden to carry as is.

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The 4 Best Motion Duck Decoys for the Money – Reviews 2020 Photo by Florida Fish and Wildlife / CC BY If you want to bag a duck or two on your next hunt, a motion duck decoy will only make the job significantly easier. Even if it’s hard to conceive, real ducks really do fall for decoys when they see them moving realistically in their water. When hunting for any kind of waterfowl, you want your decoys to be as real as possible in order to draw more game over.